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  • High School ELA Courses

     

    Four (4) credits of high school English are required for graduation. To attain either a Regents diploma or an Advanced Designation Regents diploma, a student must pass the Regents exam in English Language Arts.

  • 11F301 English 9 This course parallels the English 9R curriculum through the study of literature and an understanding of language structure. Collaborative work and oral presentations will encourage students to employ higherorder thinking skills as well as improve oral communication. Independent reading and homework assignments are integral to the course and encourage students to analyze material critically. This is a modified version of the English 9R curriculum. This course is aligned to the New York State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy. Prerequisite: Recommendation by CSE. Grade 9, 1 credit

    11F001R English 9 R English 9R is a rigorous course with a curriculum that appeals to various learning styles. This course emphasizes the study of literature and the development of writing skills; creative activity and critical thought promote an understanding of language structure. Through novels and plays such as Tuesdays With Morrie, The Five People You Meet in Heaven, Of Mice and Men, A Separate Peace, A Raisin in the Sun and The House on Mango Street, non-fiction texts, short stories, poetry, and other literary works including Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet and Homer’s Odyssey, students interpret the relationship of form and style to content. Writing includes a research paper, expository, argument, persuasion, and creative pieces. Students acquire vocabulary and grammar proficiency and oral presentations encourage students to employ higher-thinking skills and improve oral communication. Independent reading and homework assignments are integral and encourage students to analyze material critically. This course is aligned to the New York State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy. Grade 9, 1 credit

    11F001H English 9 H English 9 Honors is a more rigorous course that emphasizes the writing process and the study of various literary genres that include short stories, poetry, epics and tragedies. The “Hero’s Journey” theme forms the basis for discussion of fiction and non-fiction works including, but not limited to: Beowulf, Grendel, The Odyssey, The Orestia, The Epic of Gilgamesh, Iphigenia in Aulis, Julius Caesar, and Romeo and Juliet. Students also read non-fiction selections in conjunction with major works throughout the year. Students write a research paper, expository, argument, and narrative essays, reflective journals and creative pieces. Group presentations are also an integral component of this course, as are vocabulary development and grammar skills. Students are encouraged to find their voices in both class discussions and oral presentations. This course is aligned to the New York State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy. Prerequisites: A minimum grade of a “B+” in English 8 and English teacher recommendation. Grade 9, 1 credit (W: +0.25)

    12F301 English 10 English 10 emphasizes the study of different literary genres including drama, novels, and poetry. The course is designed to integrate skills such as vocabulary development, spelling, grammar and usage. Literature in this course includes: To Kill a Mockingbird, Macbeth, Inherit the Wind, Lord of the Flies, Animal Farm and independent reading. This is a modified version of the English 10R curriculum. This course is aligned to the New York State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy. Prerequisite: Recommendation by CSE. Grade 10, 1 credit

    12FOO1R English 10 R English 10R is a rigorous course which emphasizes the study of different literary genres including drama, novels, poetry and short stories. The curriculum integrates skills such as vocabulary development, spelling, grammar, usage, notetaking and study skills. Writing includes a research paper, literary analysis, and persuasive and argument essays, Creative writing includes original memoirs, poetry and short stories. Students reinforce and extend principles of research that serve as background information for understanding select pieces of literature. A complete research unit focuses on an individual poet and analysis of selected poems. Students participate in classroom and small group discussions and give both formal and informal presentations. Literature for the course includes but is not limited to: The Color of Water, The Glass Castle, Macbeth, The Crucible, Lord of the Flies, To Kill a Mockingbird and selected nonfiction works such as the “I Have a Dream” speech and additional texts thematically related to major works. Students also select, read and report on outside independent reading books. This course is aligned to the New York State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy. Grade 10, 1 credit

    12F001H English 10 H English 10 Honors is a more rigorous course designed to challenge students who seek an in-depth study of literature and writing. Readings such as Outliers and Boy’s Life, A Tale of Two Cities, Frankenstein, Falling Leaves, and Macbeth are anchored in American and British literature; outside readings are related thematically to units of study. Non-fiction texts, such as How to Read Literature Like a Professor are also read in conjunction with major works covered in the course. Students complete a research-based paper and projects, as well as expository, argument and narrative writings. The writing process is emphasized in the first semester. The second semester includes writing pieces that help students develop rhetorical skills such as tone, attitude, and writer’s voice. Students learn how to integrate research skills, writing skills, and oral presentation skills in order to present and defend an informed opinion. Vocabulary acquisition and grammar/usage skills are an integral part of the program. Students are expected to participate actively in class discussion, small group work, formal and informal presentations, and dramatic readings and performances. This course is aligned to the New York State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy and is comparable to a pre – AP level course. Prerequisites: A minimum grade of a “B+” in English 9 H or a grade of an “A” in English 9 R and English teacher recommendation. Grade 10, 1 credit (W: +0.25) 

    13F301 English 11 English 11 centers on American Literature and themes consistent with the American history social studies curriculum. Readings in the course will explore the promises and limitations of the American dream. Key novels include The Great Gatsby and Catcher in the Rye. Other works include essays, poems, and plays such as Death of a Salesman, Lost in Yonkers and Othello. This course is a modified version of the English 11R curriculum. This course is aligned to the State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy. All students must take the New York State Regents in English. This course is aligned to the New York State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy. Prerequisite: Recommendation by CSE. Grade 11, 1 credit

    13F001R English 11 R This is a rigorous course focused on American literature and themes consistent with the 11th grade American History social studies curriculum. Readings in the course will explore the promises and the limitations of the American dream. Key novels include The Great Gatsby and Catcher in the Rye and Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass. Other works include essays, poems, and plays such as Death of a Salesman, Lost in Yonkers, and Othello. Students develop writing portfolios that include argument essays and text-dependent responses. Each quarter will include an oral presentation, in-depth vocabulary study, and a performance-based project. Two key presentations include our “Shark Tank” research project and a spoken word performance unit. All 11th grade students must take the New York State Regents exam in English Language Arts. This course is aligned to the New York State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy. Grade 11, 1 credit

    13F001A AP® English Language and Composition This most rigorous course is for highly motivated 11th grade students willing to enroll in a challenging college-level English course. Students examine issues of author’s voice, intent, and context. They become adept at analyzing a writer’s rhetorical purpose and in discussing (orally and in writing) the strategies and devices a writer uses to fulfill that purpose. Students will craft various genres of writing including researchbased persuasive essays, social analysis and criticism, literary analysis, and creative writing, including satire. Students must be willing to undertake a demanding reading schedule that includes selections from fiction and non-fiction. Longer works include Pride and Prejudice, The Great Gatsby, The Scarlet Letter, The Grapes of Wrath, and Othello. Shorter works include Candide, A Modest Proposal, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass and argumentative essays of social criticism. Class participation is an essential responsibility of students in this course. Students in AP English Language are required to take the New York State Regents exam in English Language Arts and the AP exam in English Language and Composition. This course is aligned to the New York State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy. Prerequisites: A minimum grade of a “B+” in English 10 H or a grade of an “A” in English 10 R and English teacher recommendation. Grade 11, 1 credit (W: +0.5)

    14F301 English 12 This course is designed to develop listening, note-taking, outlining, and study skills. Students will use a variety of writing assignments such as journals, dialectical writings, personal narratives, college essays, poetry, and research papers in order to recognize the importance of revision and the composition process. Readings will include a broad range of literary works and an analysis of a variety of literary elements and techniques. This course is a modified version of the Senior English Studies curriculum. This course is aligned to the New York State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy. Prerequisite: Recommendation by CSE. Grade 12, 1 credit 

    14F007 Senior English Studies Senior English Studies is a rigorous course for 12th grade students. Students will develop close reading skills necessary for college-level literature, discourse, composition and presentation. Written assignments include personal narrative, persuasive, expository and analytical essays. A cumulative research paper is required in the fourth quarter. On a daily basis students use technology by employing Chromebooks for researching and submitting material. Readings include, but are not limited to, Angela’s Ashes, The Kite Runner, Night, Fences, Antigone, Metamorphosis, The Comedy of Errors, and The Life of Pi and various short stories, non-fiction articles, and classic and contemporary poetry. Throughout the school year, several projects culminate in oral presentations and seminar discussions. This course is aligned to the New York State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy. Grade 12, 1 credit

    14FO11A AP® English 12 Literature and Composition This is a most rigorous course for 12th grade students willing to enroll in a challenging college-level English course. The course emphasizes the development of skills in critical reading of imaginative and discursive literature. A variety of writing assignments include journal writing, timed analytic writings, personal essays, literary analysis, and a literary research paper. The primary mode of instruction is discussion and students must participate actively. Students must also undertake a rigorous reading schedule which may include such works as The Things They Carried, The Tender Bar, Night, Oedipus Rex, Antigone, King Lear, Hamlet, and A Streetcar Named Desire. An extensive poetry unit teaches both the form and content of classical and contemporary works. Selected short stories, essays and literary criticism are taught in conjunction with major works and preparation for the AP Literature exam. Challenging independent reading culminates in a literary research paper. Students are required to take the AP exam in English Literature and Composition. This course is aligned to the New York State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy. NOTE: As this is a college level course, students should plan to work an hour to an hour and a half outside of class as part of their daily schedules. Prerequisites: A minimum grade of a “B+” in AP English Language and Composition or a grade of an “A” in English 11 R and English teacher recommendation. Grade 12, 1 credit (W: +0.5)

    15H210 Writing Techniques 9-10 This course is designed primarily for mainstreamed students who either need extra help in English or who have not met New York State Learning Standards as determined by the 8th grade English Language Arts assessment (ELA) and additional criteria, such as teacher recommendation. Class size is limited, allowing for small group instruction and greater student/teacher interaction. As part of the state-mandated Response to Intervention (RTI) program, this course reinforces both reading and writing skills including the writing process, essay, narrative and creative writing, writing in response to literature and preparing for the New York State Regents exam. Self-reflection and peer evaluation are encouraged. Students work in an environment specifically designed to foster a positive experience with writing and will focus on areas that need improvement. This course meets every other day for the full year. This course has not been approved by the NCAA Clearinghouse, for purposes of determining a student athlete’s GPA for eligibility: Prerequisite: English teacher recommendation. Grades 9, 10; ½ credit

    15H408R Regents Reading and Writing Techniques This course is designed as a support class for students in 11th or 12th grade who will be taking the New York State Regents in English Language Arts. Preparation includes extensive work in writing analytical and argument essays and reading for critical analysis. Teachers work with students in small class settings to practice the ELA Regents tasks and to support improved reading comprehension and writing skills. This course meets either every day for one semester or every other day for the full school year. This course has not been approved by the NCAA Clearinghouse, for purposes of determining a student athlete’s GPA for eligibility: Prerequisite: English teacher recommendation Grades 11, 12; ½ credit

    85F101 Read 180 This course emphasizes reading comprehension and the development of writing skills. This course directly addresses individual needs through differentiated instruction and through the use of adaptive and scientifically research-based instructional software. Prerequisite: Recommendation by CSE. Grades 9, 10, 11, 12; 1 credit

    15H018 Film Study: From Classics to Comedy Students in this course will view, write and analyze significant classic films from the 20th to the 21st century. Students in this class learn cinematic vocabulary, identifying directors’ purpose, and exploring storyboard creation, animation, and script writing. This introductory course covers multiple genres such as: classics, westerns, science fiction, drama, action, horror, comedy, animation and documentary. Movie selections vary from year to year; the films viewed offer students the opportunity to explore the craft of film creation and development in each of the genres covered. Students will write reviews, submit projects, and present researched material to the class. A final project is due at the end of the semester. The course meets every day for one semester or every other day for a full year. Grades 10, 11 12 ½ credit

    15H025 Creative Writing Creative Writing addresses a wide range of abilities and interests; its goal is to develop a student’s understanding of style, voice and narrative in literary genres. Students write short fiction, creative nonfiction, one-act plays and poetry. Students will have the opportunity to experiment with dialogue, description, imagery, point of view and allusion. Works by successful writers act as models and the class frequently participates in a peer workshop to enhance critical literary judgment. Students develop writings for publication in Phoenix, the Manhasset High School literary journal, and for performance in the Poetry Coffee House (PoCoHo) events. Students are encouraged to enter works in local and national juried writing contests. This course meets every day for one semester. Grades 9, 10, 11, 12; ½ credit

    15H026 Advanced Creative Writing Workshop Do you ever feel that you could get more out of your writing experience? Do you wish you had time to delve deeper into your favorite genre of writing? Does advancing your collection of literary techniques and styles interest you? Advanced Creative Writing Workshop is a course that will help those who want to build and finesse their words and uncover the artful process of writing. This student-centered class is intended for lovers of the written word, writers with a passion for the literary arts, and those who want to build a portfolio of their written work in their favorite genre. This class will expand students’ views of the way authors write, the way they, as emerging authors, write, and how the experience of artful reading brings depth and breadth to the writing experience. We will look at both classic and contemporary short stories, poems and narrative essays as ways in which to enter into conversations with our own writing, developing style, voice, meaning, and purpose. Students will leave with a portfolio of their own writing they can use to enter contests, submit for publication or for personal projects and explorations. Student writers will emerge with a greater sense of their writing skill, process, and talent. Pre-requisite: Creative Writing Grades 9, 10, 11, 12; ½ credit

    15H030 Journalism: From the Printed Page to the Digital Era Students in this course will examine the changing field of journalism. Topics we explore include journalistic ethics, the history and the future of journalism—from print to digital media—notable figures in the industry, interview techniques and strategies and the stages of editorial production. After critiquing the work of published writers, students will study the components of a newspaper and write their own news and feature articles, editorials and film and book reviews, and will also publish their work in Indian Ink, the online school newspaper. Students will also critique techniques and practices of digital, online, and broadcast media. This course, which meets every day for one semester, will culminate with students creating components of an online newspaper and accompanying digital broadcast. Grades 9, 10, 11, 12; ½ credit

    15H038 Speech and Debate In this course students learn the two major aspects of effective communication. After studying the essential ingredients of public speaking, students write and present a variety of speeches including information based and persuasive speeches. During the second half of the semester, students learn the art of Lincoln-Douglas debate, the format used by high school and college forensic leagues throughout the United States. After studying debate essentials, students work in cooperative learning groups utilizing print and on-line sources, developing affirmative and negative constructives, cross-examination questions and rebuttals on a debate topic relevant to our contemporary world. This course meets every day for one semester. Grades 9, 10, 11, 12; ½ credit

     

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